#BlackLivesMatter

The case study of both Arab Spring and Euromaiden movements were both spoken about in this weeks tutorial. Its interesting to see that many of the movements or issues in our society today are reflected, deeply debated about and provoke movement between groups of like minded people. #BlackLivesMatter is a movement that although isn’t ‘new’ knowledge, is a movement that is continuing to grow in both supporters and coverage. All around the world supporters of #blacklivesmatter are seen protesting in areas which stop the normal everyday activities. These are all organised through twitter and Facebook as well as many other social media sites. This way of connectivity provides impact, resourcefulness and a movement that won’t go away anytime soon. It provides like minded people with a way to find other like minded people in order to create power and a public voice all around the world, a lot faster and easier.

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13 thoughts on “#BlackLivesMatter

  1. #BlackLivesMatter is definitely one of the most updated and constant tags used by social media activists. There is constantly information being tweeted, whether it be regarding a protest, new statistics and other various things. It’s incredible how social media has provided a voice for minorities and smaller groups of people. What are your thoughts on slacktivism? Do you think that our generation have become slack when it comes to online activism?

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  2. #BlackLivesMatter has always been there but recently it has become more popular in our news. I believe it is due to the amount of police footage being release. About the excessive force being used towards them. At the same time people have been making another hashtag #AllLivesMatter. The issue behind this new hashtag was that it’s shadowing the issues the #BlackLivesMatter is trying to show. Here is the article if you want to read more about it. http://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/entry/dear-fellow-white-people-_b_11109842

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  3. Hey Jade,

    You briefly touched on social media and it’s capabilities through the example of #BlackLivesMatter. I wanted to know more, more about the issue, how it unfolded and your thoughts. I think its a positive sign, the power of social media is being used to condemn the actions of corrupt or negligent authorities, where the oppressed collectives are activated. But at the same time are we slacking off, remember when KONY 2012 took off [ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y4MnpzG5Sqc ] ? We all jumped on that boat and it quickly deteriorated. What are your thoughts on our role in social movements online? Thanks for sharing!

    – Sonny

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    1. Hey sonny, Thanks for the comment!
      I think its interesting that you asked me that. Recently a friend of mine invited me to a #blacklivesmatter movement. I found it funny at first as excuse me, wasn’t black. Upon reading about it however and engaging so much in visual content seeing just what goes on in america for example. I found a strange urge to go and support the people who are wrongly accused and persecuted all around the world due to race. The movement didn’t just become a racial matter but a movement every race could get behind, to support a race which is wrongly persecuted everyday in society and show that we don’t support what is happening.
      Its movements like these online which I think bring us all together as human beings, supporting other human beings through a movement we should all be passionate about. It raises a much needed social awareness.

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  4. Due to the coverage of #blacklivesmatter, there has been a ‘opposing’ movement of #alllivesmatter. However the movement has split communities, rather than bringing everyone together. As twitter user @djsoap92 states “#alllivesmatter is like going to the Dr with a broken arm and he says ‘all bones matter,’ ok but right now lets take care of this broken one.”

    Here’s a good link of some philosophers discussing the issue: http://shifter-magazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Whats-Wrong-With-All-Lives-Matter.pdf

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  5. It surprises me that in this day an age, this is still an issue that we are dealing with. The Black Lives Matter hashtag is one that is progressively spreading through my social media pages daily and although not everyone does something about it, in basic behavioral psychology awareness is the first step towards change. I recently watched the film Fruitvale Station which is a true story about Oscar Grant, a 22-year who was shot dead by police for “not co-operating” except he was unarmed and was only asking why he was being detained. Video footage of that went majorly viral and had such an impact they decided to make a movie about it. I found this great article by WIRED which explains the role of social media in the black lives matter campaign, check it out if your interested…

    https://www.wired.com/2015/10/how-black-lives-matter-uses-social-media-to-fight-the-power/

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  6. #blacklivesmatter is definitely one of the most noted and popular movements of today, but whether it’s actually doing any good is another question. I’ve seen parodies of the hashtag such as #whitelivesmatter, and even as of recently #clownlivesmater. While protests in the streets become violent, I think the hashtag allows people online to feel like they are doing something toward the cause, even if it is ignored.

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  7. I think that the most influential thing to come out of the #blacklivesmatter movement is that the hashtag is now a forum where people can easily share videos of police brutality with an engaged audience. Anyone that experiences this brutality first-hand, or is a witness to it, can easily tweet about it or upload video evidence of the incident. This immediacy and participation from the broader community allows incidents like those seen throughout the #blacklivesmatter movement to no longer be swept under the rug.

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  8. Great post! Although personally I didn’t dive into the movement of #blacklivesmatter throughout my own post I definitely do agree with the arguments you’ve raised. As this is one of the most popular movements of our day it has has had a huge definitely impact, as this influential hashtag shows just how important social media has become to modern-day activism. I think it’s really important as not only does this movement create a platform of awareness, but it also helps individuals share their own stories on this issue, giving them courage as well as helping to bring this issue to the surface and make a change.
    Can’t wait to read more!

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  9. BLM is such an important hashtag on social media, particularly Twitter in getting the word out there about the institutionalised brutality. Prior to the hashtag there wasn’t much exposure on this issue, but now almost everyone knows about it and by spreading awareness, hoping to make a change. The power of social media in this campaign has played a significant role, trending on Twitter giving it the exposure, uncovering the truth and protesting for change and justice. This article highlights the importance of Americans getting involved in politics in order to make a change in society- https://killscreen.com/articles/american-politics-importance-participation/

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  10. Really liked that you used #blacklivesmatter as an example. Its such an important, powerful movement in today’s society. I think many people see this movement as an American issue, and while this is true we in Australia as well as countless other parts of the world, should take note. This type of connectivity also makes it easier to start a movement, I think we are privileged in that way as opposed to previous generations. Like imagine a twitter movement to protest the Vietnam war in the 70s? Crazy to think.
    🙂

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  11. Good example used as it illustrated that Twitter is highly efficient in amplification and distribution of information, to the coordination and mobilization of ‘like minded people’ for mass actions.

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