Oran Park House/Catherine Park House, 1817.

Oran Park House built in 1817 by John Douglas Campbell is a Country manor house replicated like that of an English style manor located in the Sydney Metropolitan area, Cobbity.

The land, the House is situated on passed from the Dharawal People to European settlers which was eventually sub-divided.Surrounded by early settlers and farm land, Campbell was shot and killed on the land in 1827 in pursuit of a trespasser. The house was passed down and sold numerous of times, in which times the house and land was used for many different purposes. This included a military camp and a grenade firing range during the second world war. John- Dawson daymer was the last true owner of the property before his death in 2000.

This Georgian style home surrounded by a picturesque landscape is, inside anything but. Although the property oozes character, showcasing the history through style and renovation, conspiracy theories surrounding the house remain unsolved. ‘A woman died in bed on the second floor due to a disease from one of the soldiers’ stated Steven Hall, resident in Harrington Grove. Harrington Grove located opposite Catherine Park house is a new established estate. ‘A man, for instance, was said to have hung himself from the now removed bell tower’ he continued.

Oran Park house recently renamed Catherine Park House, is now occupied by the Catherine park estate sales team who are sectioning the land and selling certain divisions at a time. Carrie Cable, a land sales employee at Catherine Park often works in the house alone, and has had quite a few encounters within the house, ‘I always hear a man singing…and the other day a light bulb smashed’ she stated as well as hearing footsteps.

Most people within the area don’t know a lot about Catherine Park house, and neither did the Catherine park sales team until they started experiencing things that were out of the ordinary, including squeaking stairs and doors slamming. After taking a trip to local libraries, council records and museums it is clear why most of the conspiracies haven’t been solved. There isn’t much information surrounding the deaths of family members, what I could find however is that John William Campbell was shot and killed on the land in 1827 in pursuit of a trespasser as well as reading in a journal entry that a woman fell very sick at the home and there was no cure. Could this be the woman on the second floor? One thing is for sure, there is someone in that house.

https://storify.com/jadelauren_hall/catherine-park-estate-sales-team

Week 5 (Module):

Short critique of the ‘Creature of the night’-

https://soundcloud.com/jl_osborne/creature-of-the-night

The title was engaging and drew me in, and upon the first few seconds of the audio narrative the ambient noise was of a great quality and seemed to fit the title, however when the interviewee began, the ambient sounds and music had nothing to do with what was being said. The twist in narrative arc was great with the interviewee introducing himself towards the end rather than at the start was different and gave a great effect as the main point of the narrative was stated at the end (Working night shifts at McDonalds).

The interview was clear and concise however the use of some slang made it hard to follow especially because it was repeated twice towards the middle of the recording. other than this, i enjoyed the way the story was twisted in a way that still remained truthful to the subject. gathering emotion when necessary.

What happens to a person with no place?

Kerrie Hall, aged 39, reminisces on her childhood briefly but with a painful past, risen by a single mum, nothing was constant within her life. This led to Kerrie feeling unsettled about not having a place to call home, therefore constantly changing the ‘homes’ she has lived in. The past is what shapes a person, Kerrie confronts her past, the decisions she has made and the determination a mother will go through in creating a home for her children to grow up in.

Creating a better Place (Week 4)

Intrigued by a woman who is constantly changing things in her life and house, frustrates my whole family. With a deep past and childhood, growing up not knowing the meaning of home, it opened my eyes to see how she truly thinks, and how she believes that by making everything perfect and ‘idealistic’ she is making a home. When interviewing Kerrie Hall, it became evident that there were some parts of her life that she wasn’t ready to share with anyone- parts of her life that were painful.

Kerrie doesn’t really have a place and that’s what made for an intriguing interview. When talking off mic, she believed that she had no place. She never felt at home, and never had a true ‘home’ growing up, which has led her to becoming the person she is today.

Instead she shares with us the details that made her happy, the things she remembers. The tone exhilarates as she reminisces about these things, yet the tone drops from happy to grim, with a contrasting memory reflected next to the good ones. Within the interview there doesn’t seem to be much emotion, when she talks about the things in her past, which may be her only way to cope with whatever happened to her as a child. The emotion lifts towards the end as she explains the real motive for changing the things around her.

Focusing to create that perfect place

Intrigued by a woman who is constantly changing things in her life and house, frustrates my whole family. With a deep past and childhood, growing up not knowing the meaning of home, it opened my eyes to see how she truly thinks, and how she believes that by making everything perfect and ‘idealistic’ she is making a home. When interviewing Kerrie Hall, it became evident that there were some parts of her life that she wasn’t ready to share with anyone- parts of her life that were painful.

Kerrie doesn’t really have a place and that’s what made for an intriguing interview. When talking off mic, she believed that she had no place. She never felt at home, and never had a true ‘home’ growing up, which has led her to becoming the person she is today.

Instead she shares with us the details that made her happy, the things she remembers. The tone exhilarates as she reminisces about these things, yet the tone drops from happy to grim, with a contrasting memory reflected next to the good ones. Within the interview there doesn’t seem to be much emotion, when she talks about the things in her past, which may be her only way to cope with whatever happened to her as a child. The emotion lifts towards the end as she explains the real motive for changing the things around her.

No place like…construction?!

This week and last, my house has been under construction, the wooden flooring which once faulty has now been replaced by bamboo flooring. The constant change in my home has left me feeling annoyed and extremely interrupted (Which is why the post is late). I tried to capture the essence of what myself and my family have been living in for the past 3 weeks, utter chaos. The sounds are nothing short of loud and disruptive, yet we continue to go about our lives in a way that baffles many, unaffected.

It wasn’t too hard capturing the sounds because they were so loud and over powering within my house, therefore it was easier to ignore the back ground noise. However due to the sound levels, i had to decrease the volume in order for each individual sound recording to be heard distinctively. Portraying the environment through sound often contrasted what i was feeling. In a way yes, the sound created by the tradies was one of the hardest parts but it was more about the inconvenience, for instance- sharing beds, not being able to get into the kitchen, not having any furniture out. Its hard to portray those sort of inconveniences as well as the way the person felt about it them in a sound image.

Mick Fanning Shark attack and the explosion that followed.

Throws a left, lands a right… Mick fanning is truly lucky to be alive. Fanning’s split second decisions led to his safety on the dreaded day of the J-Bay open.

Captured on live TV, onlookers around the world watched as Fanning fought for his life, marking the start of a media uproar. Social networks such as Facebook and Twitter were flooded as well as live TV channels, radios and memes being generated, all raising awareness of the shocking event.

Examples of the media explosion cane found here: https://storify.com/jadelauren_hall/

Last night 60 minutes, interviewed Mick Fanning about the shark attack as well as documenting his first time back in the water since the attack, Fanning being paid $75k which he donated to body boarder Matt Lee, after he was mauled by a shark last month. Again this sparked a heavy flow of media due to the heroic and thoughtful donation. 60 Minutes used footage from the event, as well as his interview, underwater cameras to shoot his ‘first surf’ back, as well as other cameras in order to capture angles that a had held camera could not.

This example shows us the way in which media transcends platforms, with the use of citizen journalism as well as media content creators assisting journalists in the spreading of the ‘official story’ of a particular event. It seems as if content users and creators deem whether a story is important in order for it to be spread in some cases.

A  big Good-luck to Fanning and Wilson for Tahiti! 🙂

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